3 Things You Should Know Before Going Gluten Free

photo via Voo Berlin

 

If you are like me, I like to change up my eating habits so that I don’t get bored and de-motivated. When you hear people say that they are vegan, dairy free or gluten free you think ‘what can you even eat?’

But it’s good to be educated on the health complications of gluten and figure out whether it’s something for you! All big food stores have ‘free from’ sections so why not try it for 2-3 weeks and see the benefit.

What is Gluten Free anyway?

Firstly, let us define what gluten is and what foods you will find it in. Gluten is the name for the proteins that give wheat its unique baking qualities. It determines the ability of wheat to absorb water, stick together, and remain elastic. Wheat is the main gluten food but many others also contain these proteins. Gluten foods include other grass-related grains, barley, and rye.

Gluten is found in baked foods such as bread and pasta. However, you can still buy gluten free pasta for example so it is not the end of the world!

Symptoms of a gluten intolerance

1. Fatigue or brain fog after eating a meal that contains gluten
2. Migraines or severe headaches on a daily occurrence
3. Inflammation, swelling or pain in your joints
4. Mood issues such as anxiety, depression, mood swings and ADD
5. Bloating after eating a meal with gluten in it
6. Belly pains

If you have these symptoms they could be pointing towards a gluten intolerance, but they could also mean something else which is why it’s good to see a doctor for a full diagnosis. They’ll recommend you keep a food diary, so write down everything you’re eating and any symptoms you experience to give them the full picture.

It’s not always the healthier choice

Trying gluten-free out and recording the changes you experience is a good way to figure out if it’s the right lifestyle choice for you. There’s no evidence that gluten-free has any beneficial effects for those who don’t suffer from an intolerance, and it probably won’t lose weight as they contain other grains that are higher in carbohydrates. Also, if you decide to go gluten-free you should make sure you’re getting your vitamins and minerals, as gluten-free products are low in fiber and iron.

But if you want to give gluten-free a try, there are lots of recipes nowadays that don’t use gluten, and ordering in a restaurant isn’t as hard as you’d think these days!

LET’S CHAT

Have you tried to go gluten-free? Share your experience with us.


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photo via Voo Berlin

 

If you are like me, I like to change up my eating habits so that I don’t get bored and de-motivated. When you hear people say that they are vegan, dairy free or gluten free you think ‘what can you even eat?’

But it’s good to be educated on the health complications of gluten and figure out whether it’s something for you! All big food stores have ‘free from’ sections so why not try it for 2-3 weeks and see the benefit.

1. What is Gluten Free anyway?

Firstly, let us define what gluten is and what foods you will find it in. Gluten is the name for the proteins that give wheat its unique baking qualities. It determines the ability of wheat to absorb water, stick together, and remain elastic. Wheat is the main gluten food but many others also contain these proteins. Gluten foods include other grass-related grains, barley, and rye.

Gluten is found in baked foods such as bread and pasta. However, you can still buy gluten free pasta for example so it is not the end of the world!

2. Symptoms of a gluten intolerance

1. Fatigue or brain fog after eating a meal that contains gluten
2. Migraines or severe headaches on a daily occurrence
3. Inflammation, swelling or pain in your joints
4. Mood issues such as anxiety, depression, mood swings and ADD
5. Bloating after eating a meal with gluten in it
6. Belly pains

If you have these symptoms they could be pointing towards a gluten intolerance, but they could also mean something else which is why it’s good to see a doctor for a full diagnosis. They’ll recommend you keep a food diary, so write down everything you’re eating and any symptoms you experience to give them the full picture.

3. It’s not always the healthier choice

Trying gluten-free out and recording the changes you experience is a good way to figure out if it’s the right lifestyle choice for you. There’s no evidence that gluten-free has any beneficial effects for those who don’t suffer from an intolerance, and it probably won’t lose weight as they contain other grains that are higher in carbohydrates. Also, if you decide to go gluten-free you should make sure you’re getting your vitamins and minerals, as gluten-free products are low in fiber and iron.

But if you want to give gluten-free a try, there are lots of recipes nowadays that don’t use gluten, and ordering in a restaurant isn’t as hard as you’d think these days!

LET’S CHAT

Have you tried to go gluten-free? Share your experience with us.


Sign up for our newsletter and stay up to date

  • I have a feeling I might be intolerant but I have not tried cutting it out completely yet. Keeping a food diary will be super helpful ♥

    Amy // Snippets of Amy

  • Keeping a food diary is what I recommend to my patients when they start developing signs of intolerance to foods. It’s incredibly helpful for both the doctor and patient to go through the items together. If there’s any indication of possible celiac disease, we then send the patient out for deamidated gliadin IgA and IgG antibody labs. Great post on gluten free diets! I am always turned off by preaching blogs that enforce gluten-free everything when there isn’t scientific evidence behind it.

  • Such a good post – so many people have started going gluten free! x
    Izzy | https://pinchofdelight.wordpress.com

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